Development of Strategies to Help

Slide 1

Anne Henderson
University College, Bangor Wales

Slide 2

Specific Problems

Dyscalculia Problems

Slide 3

Fractions Number line

Fraction Numbers

Slide 4

Percentages

Percentages

Slide 5

Aspects of Estimation

  • Easy numbers
  • Ignore decimal points
  • Rough estimates
  • Educated guess
  • World of work

Slide 6

Basic Algebra

Basic Algebra

Slide 7

Aspects of Shape & Space

  • Explore 2D & 3D
  • Physical experience
  • Use specific apparatus
  • Create patterns
  • Refine language

Slide 8

Aspects of Data Handling

  • Discuss the problem
  • Plan what data
  • Reduce the data
  • Interpretation of graphs
  • Names on graphs

Slide 9

Some Reasons for Difficulties with Homework/ Assignments

  • Extra concentration
  • Books forgotten
  • Reading time
  • Written work
  • Teacher-initiated statements

Slide 10

Classroom Strategies

  • Clear instructions
  • Help students understand why
  • Books uncluttered
  • Mark - quick intervention
  • Inter-relate basic facts
  • Avoid speed
  • Revisit topics
  • Point out patterns

Slide 11

General Strategies

  • List of numbers
  • Memory cards
  • Four rules
  • Computer skills
  • Allow use of dictaphone
  • Ensure spellings are visible
  • New terminology

Slide 12

Maths Staff can help by:

  • Syllabus, exam content and handing in dates
  • Mathematical topic
  • Encourage non-dyslexics to sit with dyslexics
  • Oral instructions
  • Study skills
  • Good exam techniques

Slide 13

Revision Timetable

  • Long term timetable
  • Medium term timetable
  • Short term timetable
  • Three weeks before exam...
  • Just before exam...

Slide 14

Summary

  • West (1999) describes the dyslexic person as 'one who can see the unseen, understand patterns of incomplete information and comprehend the complex whole'.
  • 'Specialists in many fields recognise the power of visual approaches. Dyslexia should be viewed as a difference not a deficit and strengths in visualisation should be utilised'.
  • Words by the Waterboys,

'I saw the crescent, but you saw the whole of the moon'
may well refer to the processing style of dyslexics
(Reid & Kirk 2001).